Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Peppers


California Wonder Bell Peppers fresh from the garden. Some I allowed to ripen to a complete red and others are still green. The red ones will provide my seeds for next year. 


Huge blocky traditional peppers.


And lots of them. Normally earlier but with our cooler temperatures this year they are a bit late.

 
Some are dehydrated


Some are stuffed and frozen for winter meals. 


These will be thrown into pastas and added to casseroles throughout the year.


No special preparation needed. Just wash and slice as desired then freeze and bag.


Lots of slicing but well worth the effort when I look at the price of peppers in the grocery store. Peppers are simple to grow and I have saved seeds from this variety for years now. 


I personally adore the red ones in my pickles!

Blessings from The Holler

The Canned Quilter



14 comments:

  1. That jar of pickles looks absolutely YUMMY!

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  2. How many of those peppers do you plant to get that kind of harvest? I am still working on trying to find the right number to grow so that I get the right yield. It seems like a tricky dance!

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    Replies
    1. That is from 9 very healthy plants in a bed.

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  3. How do you make sure your peppers don't cross-pollinate with each other? I'm growing a lot of different peppers in a small garden area & want to keep the seeds "pure."

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    1. You would have to put mesh bags over the and separate them with lots of space between them. I have 3 gardens spaced out over about 12 acres and beds far enough apart that i usually do not have to worry about cross pollination.

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  4. Your photos are just beautiul.. Are you sharing the recipe for the stuffed [ready to freeze] peppers?

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    Replies
    1. http://hickeryhollerfarm.blogspot.com/2010/08/freezing-stuffed-peppers.html

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  5. Do you cook the stuff pepper before you freeze them?

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    Replies
    1. No they are frozen raw and then removed from the freezer and baked with a sauce over them.

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  6. I was given a bell pepper starter plant this year and the thing never grew to more than 5 in and never flowered or gave me any peppers. I am going to have to order seeds this year.

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    Replies
    1. Peppers like fertile and well drained soil and lots of sunshine. They are a heat loving plant and will sit and languish in cooler temperatures and NEVER grow, blossom or fruit. I plant mine in a bed that has large stones around it. The stones help to absorb the heat and keep them warmer. Or I have planted them along my concrete sidewalk.

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  7. " I plant mine in a bed that has large stones around it. The stones help to absorb the heat and keep them warmer. Or I have planted them along my concrete sidewalk." Prime example as to why this is my favorite blog!!! I have added this hint to my gardening arsenal for future planting seasons. My poor little pepper plants just gave up in the cool temps this year....looking onward to next year with a new strategy in mind!

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  8. I haven't grown peppers in several years. Your veggie pickles look great. Maybe I'll try some again next year. We aren't planning a long vacation trip next year so I should be around to take care of them better. - Margy

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