Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Winter Stores



We've started filling our winter freezer!



Nutritionally, deer meat (venison is a broader term that also applies to meat from elk, moose, caribou and antelope) is healthier than beef. A three-ounce serving provides only 134 calories and three grams of fat, including only one gram of saturated fat. Beef gives you 259 calories for the same three-ounce serving, and 18 grams of fat, including seven grams of saturated fat.






Venison is also a tremendous source for Vitamins B12 and B6, as well as riboflavin and niacin. According to the World’s Healthiest Foods site, “Vitamin B12 and vitamin B6 are both needed to prevent a build up of a potentially dangerous molecule calledhomocysteine in the body [that] can cause damage to blood vessels.” Beyond that, venison doesn’t typically have additives or antibiotics that are often associated with commercially grown beef. According to several sources online, the riboflavin in venison can help to mitigate migraine headaches through enhanced energy metabolism in the body.
Niacin (Vitamin B3) that is found in Venison has been found to slow down the risk of developing osteoarthritis by as much as 50%. And then there’s the cholesterol to consider. Venison is super low in cholesterol, even lower than lean white chicken breast meat, so that it is ideal for anyone who is concerned with heart disease.

Blessings from The Holler

The Canned Quilter

13 comments:

  1. Great information! I had thought is to be healthier primarily on the basis of no antibiotics, hormones or radiation.

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  2. Good information and good eating.

    That boy looks pretty healthy hanging there. Would that be apple flavored deer meat? They sneak in here and eat their way through the orchard.

    Can't wait for some back strap!

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    1. Yep remember this spring when they were munching the garden and orchard pretty heavy : ) Guess what it's our turn to munch.....

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  3. Congratulations! no new venison here yet, just as well. we pick up our pork this week and need to buy a new freezer (the upright blew out when we had a power surge). We love venison, prefer doe meat, less gamely for eating as roasts and steaks. We don't hunt anymore, dearheart has a bad knee and me a bad back, but we have a few select friends who are very good hunters and they share anything they get, some even giving us the entire deer if the excitement and challenge from the hunt was their sole purpose in doing it. I have had comments from vegetarians who think it is not humane, but we have too many deer up here. This means many more will starve, weaken for coyotes to take, as well as contracting wasting disease (which appears to be caused or encouraged by overcrowding)Of course we insist that any does coming to us be tagged. Just another way to be good stewards of our lands and eat good healthy meat.

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  4. i got lucky and a friend cleaned out her freezer for this year's deer and I got the rest of the doe from last year. Still good meat!

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  5. We used to eat deer when I was kid on our farm . I haven't had a good piece of venison for years . I have had Bison which that also is better for you then beef ! Great info . I have to take extra B12 as my body doesn't absorb it just by foods and I know what lack of B12 can do to you as I suffered and still do from time to time of B12 anemia , B12 is what helps make new red blood cells for your body and muscles to function mine was practically starving for new blood cells , I was ill for a very long time , it took a long time for it all to show up on tests ! Have a good day !

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    1. I also suffer from B12 anemia and nutrient malabsorption from my days of cancer therapy. It seems chemo, radiation and potassium supplements have pretty well taken their toll on my stomach. Venison is an excellent source of B12 and helps supplement my heavy vegetable diet.

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  6. The first time I tried venison, the lack of fat surprised me. I will not show that photo to the Mr. His deer hunting season was over before it started, due to health issues (nothing serious, but still no hunting), so we have ordered some local bison meat and are looking forward to a full freezer again. Our neighbors are raising Scotland Highlanders and told that meat is good also.

    Stay healthy Country Gal. I had severe anemia and never want that again!!! It took the doctors over two months to find out why I was so tired and having trouble breathing and a year to get better. Mine was from lack of iron. I am on iron and B vitamins forever.

    blessings, jill

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    1. Wow I am seeing an anemia and B12 pattern here.

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  7. CQ, Thank you for the information on Venison. I suffered from anemia for sometime 5 years ago. I had bad brain fog, trouble breathing, severe heart palpitations and problems speaking. After feeding myself the traditonal diet for anemia,bloody meat and vitamins I started feeling more human.

    Great kill girl! Plenty of meat for the freezer.

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  8. First I would like to say that I love your blog. I started following it through Laura Williams Musings. Venison is such a lean meat. My husband has hunted for years. We love venison ground up into burger. As soon as my hubby shoots it, he brings it up to the house where we skin it and then process it ourselves. We know what is exactly what is in it. Nothing! I had a heart attack last December at the age of 42. I was told that venison is such a lean meat that it was on my list of meat to eat. I was happy as we had just butchered one a month before my attack. Hopefully hubby will get two this year!

    Beth

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  9. Yup, anemia, so common with us ladies. when my kids were teens and "into" all things hippie-ish and all, they wanted to try a vegetarian diet. I had no problem with that, we love veggies and they were clever enough to learn about whole proteins and all. But, I got slowly but surely run down, tired, dizzy, all the symptoms that I remember from my anemic pregnancy days. Turns out I have von Willebrands Disease, severe shortage of factor 8, also called Hemophilia Type A, fairly common as blood problems go.. My hematologist laughed with me when I told him my diet, we both agreeing I need red meat and the Dear Lord made me a carnivore, who was I to argue?? Another time I tried taking ginkgo biloba. I was a critical care RN, now retired to the farm and although I am real sharp when it comes to my patients, I don't always make good choices for me, typical woman in other words Us nurses and docs talk about supplements and such, seemed many were taking ginkgo and having good results with improved memory and all. well, I felt I could use some of that good memory stuff, change of life rearing it's funny ole' head, and started taking it. A few weeks later, covered with bruises, my doc asked me about my diet again, turns out ginkgo is a blood thinner! who knew? we laughed once again, he has the best sense of humor thank goodness. now it is just a common sense diet for me. So, what do we all take for supplements: a good senior multi-vitamin and mineral from Walmart (they test their products for reliability) and elderberry to help combat flu that we are always exposed to and vitamin D and iron for those of us low in those. B12 is not absorbed well at all in the digestive system, if you need that at some point you may want to do home injections, just once a month with a tiny needle, do it yourself or have a visiting nurse come in . I did visiting nurses for years, had many ladies taking the injections. Your doc will give you the prescription. I have elderberry bushes here, make jam and have some for breakfast on my toast each day. by the way, I love your blog my dear fellow farmwife, and I refer it to friends looking for good sound old fashioned (or not) advice. You are part of my morning routine, right after I feed the animals, something I look forward to day.

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  10. I knew deer was healthy meat for most of the reasons you shared, but that the riboflavin in it can help with migraines was news to me. My migraines have lessened in frequency and severity the last couple of years, and I just assumed it was because of added magnesium and the prescription propranolol, but it could also be because of the riboflavin via deer meat. We occasionally eat beef away from home, but at home it's always venison (unless we eat it all before the next season rolls around).

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