Friday, August 15, 2014

Corn and Cookin


Well it's another Friday morning here in Hickery Holler! Thought I would share some pictures of the corn on the cob I froze a few weeks ago. We are still eating a few of the ears that were late producing but it is just about time to pull the stalks up and compost. We had a bumper crop this year and very few coons. I personally think that with the bad economy so many people are now trapping coons for pelts in this area it has made a huge difference in their numbers.  The lady that owns the local store where everyone buys their trapping licenses said that she sold more trapping license last year than she ever had in the 30 years she has been here. O Wise One thinks that will change as soon as they have a bad year and the bottom drops out of the pelt prices.  

The other surprising thing was that we never treated this corn for ear worms and it filled out all the way to the end and we found 3 earworms in the whole patch. 


I put some corn in jars also to save on the freezer space. Great for corn chowders and soups. We use canned corn in our taco soup regularly. It is just so time consuming to can corn because the processing time is so long. 


Today the agenda includes starting plum preserves with the plums that the boys picked on Wednesday. I'll take plenty of pictures and let you know how they turn out.  


Supper last night was good and I thought I would share some pictures. Purple Hull Pea Jambalaya or a Hickery Holler version of Hoppin John. Purple hull peas, rice, sauteed onions and green peppers and about a half pound of cooked bacon. Everything but the rice grown right here on this farm. 


And rabbit pie. This is a filling of rabbit meat, chicken broth, peas, carrots and onions all simmered and then thickened with flour to make a meat pie filling. On top half a biscuit recipe flatted out thin and cut out then placed on top of the pie. Then baked in the oven till golden brown. This makes a savory meat pie and vegetable filling with crunchy thin biscuits on top to form a crispy crust.  Again everything from this farm but the wheat flour. (You can use this recipe for chicken and turkey as well)


O Wise One ate himself silly!


And lets not forget with lots of yard eggs right now and potatoes plentiful from a new harvest add some homemade dill relish and cool potato salad is a summertime favorite. 

I did cheat and buy the mayo!

Well that's another day at Hickery Holler and I am off to start those preserves. Hope everyone has a great weekend and stays safe. 

See you on Monday "If the good lords willin and the creek don't rise!"

Blessings from The Holler

The Canned Quilter 


12 comments:

  1. I always save space with my corn by cutting it off the cob then freezing it. And those plums look wonderful. I've got peaches on my counter today that I have to do something with. I'm thinking filling for cobblers.

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  2. Hard work has its own rewards.

    What a beautiful dinner. I can almost smell it.

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  3. Real food always tastes good, and it can make you hungary just looking at it too:)

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  4. Everything looks delicious!

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  5. I did a search but nothing turned up. I thought I saw a recipe on your blog for Zuchinni pickles. Am I missing it?

    So glad you're back safe and sound!!! We missed you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    1. I generally do not pickle zucchini but pretty well any recipe that uses cukes I have substituted zucchini when cucumbers were scarce.

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  6. What a great run down for several meal ideas, thank you, CQ. I especially like the looks of that purple hull pea jambalya since I need to pick my peas again tomorrow. Isn't it a great feeling to be able to fix a meal from the ingredients you grew or raised? It is such a blessing.

    Fern

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  7. I have to ask (I'm new to your blog, so sorry if you stated the answer earlier), are those ears of corn (in the first picture) vaccum packed? Raw or cooked? How well do they keep that way?

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    1. Vacuum packed corn on the cob. I do not blanch my corn but simply wash, freeze on baking sheets and then seal in bags. It is usually one of the first vegetable that we finish and is pretty well eaten up by January or so. For that 4 to 5 months it keeps wonderfully that way.

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    2. Awesome! I've not had much luck with corn, but now I won't worry so much about what I'll do if I actually DO get lucky! I hate canned corn, but love corn on the cob, and so was reluctant to plant alot.....

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  8. Your comment on the coons and the poor economy is interesting. I feel like the economy in our small town is shallow and anemic at best but most folks are quick to suggest that it's on the up swing. I think it's wishful thinking. I think this might be a difficult winter for some especially if the weather is as harsh as it was during this last winter. in the mean time we are preparing enough food for an army....just in case! :)

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    1. I do not see the economy improving in this area nor do I feel it is on the upswing. My reply is do not pee on my boots and then tell me it is raining!! I can see when people do not have jobs and are struggling with my own eyes despite what the government or media are saying and I always am prepared to feed an army. Just because that is the way I have always done it and I have raised 5 kids that have never went to bed hungry. As the child of depression survivors I think my parents simply ingrained in me to ALWAYS put aside for that rainy day that is ALWAYS likely to come any minute. Lol Blessings and thanks for visiting CQ

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