Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Blackberry Pie Filling


The tame blackberries are ripe. I made blackberry jam the other day with the wild blackberries that O Wise One picked in the woods. Tuesday morning early he picked the tame blackberries off the trellis. I washed them up and they were really nice and big.



I really can't say enough about these Doyle blackberries. They are a wonderful breed of blackberry. Unlike any I have ever grown. They make huge amounts of berries compared to other varieties. These blackberries are off just 2 bushes. Their runners however can get up to 20' long. The berries just hang in clusters like grapes. They are thornless and are they big.

My goal for the day was canning blackberry pie filling. As I sit typing this I am listening to the ping sound of my lids sealing. Six jars for the pantry : ) 



Blackberry Pie Filling


6-quarts fresh blackberries
7 cups granulated sugar (can make slight adjustments for tartness of berries)
1 3/4 cups Clear Jel
1 teaspoon cinnamon
9 1/3 cups water
1/2 cup lemon juice (this is for safety, do not decrease amount)

Select top quality, firm, ripe berries. Rinse berries and set aside.

Measure lemon juice and set aside.

Combine Clear Jel, sugar and cinnamon in a large saucepan. Add water and mix until smooth. Stirring during the thickening process is critical for a smooth end product. Heat, stirring mixture constantly until it bubbles. Quickly add lemon juice and boil 1 minute, stirring constantly. (you may add more water at this point if you wish to have a berry topping instead of pie filling). Remove from heat and fold in berries.

Fill 7 quart jars, leaving 1 to 1 1/2 inches of headspace.

Process in a boiling water canner for 30 minutes at sea level, 35 minutes at 1001 to 3000 feet and 40 minutes at altitudes 3001 to 6000 feet. Each quart of pie filling will make an 8- or 9-inch pie.




As you may have noticed the recipe makes 7 quarts but Baby O was running around licking spoons and bowls and pouting because I was putting it all in jars so I took pity on her and made that 7th quart into a crisp for supper. A little vanilla ice cream out of the freezer to go with it and she will be in heaven.

Blessings from The Holler

The Canned Quilter

20 comments:

  1. I'm drooling now! Yummy! Looks delicious!

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  2. This sounds really good. Thanks for posting the altitude adjustments. I am at 7200 feet.

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  3. Oooooohhhhh lalalalala!! Yummo!! I too have been picking blackberries and blackberries and more blackberries!!! Watch for my post tomorrow, I hope!! Blackberries like I have never seen blackberries!! They had tons of thorns though!!!

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  4. Margaret B. HigginsAugust 4, 2011 at 9:51 PM

    Thank you for your comments on the Doyle blackberries! I have been thinking about ordering some for ages. I have very limited space and need something highly productive- I'm going to order for next year!

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  5. Is the cinnamon optional in the recipe?

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  6. Once you have this canned.. how do you make your pies? pre-cook the crust? or is this only for making crisps?

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    1. I add it to my uncooked pastry shell the same as a can of purchased pie filling. If it is not thick enough I may add a tablespoon or two of instant tapioca. For crisps I simply pour it into a greased baking dish and top with an oatmeal/brown sugar/butter topping and bake until crisp.

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  7. I can't find Clear Jell -- would measurements change if I used Certo? Any other thickening options?

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    Replies
    1. Unfortunately, the answer is no Certo can not be substituted for Clear Jel.

      While they both have thickening properties, they act upon the fruit in jams and jellies differently. Pectin is a water-soluble fiber that is divided into very fine particles. When heated with a sugar solution, it takes up position, bonds with the sugar molecules and expands in a way that makes it nearly impossible to separate out from the rest of the product, thus creating a stable, gelled preserve.

      Clear Jel is a modified cornstarch that is recommended for canning because it doesn’t lose its thickening powers after extended heating (conventional cornstarch starts to break down at high heat and also doesn’t thicken high acid liquids well). Clear Jel thickens by creating bonds between the water molecules and the starch molecules. As you heat those bonded molecules up, they continue to expand until they form a network of sticky bonds that keep the liquid thick. It’s a very different process that how fruit pectins thicken, and were you to compare a well-set cherry jam and a cherry pie filling, you’d easily be able to see the difference in consistency.

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    2. Try Amazon I think they have Clear Jel. If necessary just freeze your berries until.

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    3. I was looking for Clear Jel and couldn't find it, and the Amish suggested Perma Flo, (which they just happened to carry in their store). It doesn't have a taste, doesn't break down, but it sure doesn't take very much of it. I'm still playing with the amounts.

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    4. I found Clear Jel at Cash and Carry (a restaurant supply store).

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  8. I wonder if you could use lime juice instead of lemon juice? I have recently started adding a bit of lime zest to my blackberry and raspberry pies and find the addition complimentary and delicious and have been getting rave reviews when I share my pies. Most people dont necessarily pick out the flavor--it's subtle--but I think something in the chemistry of how we humans perceive flavor is what it affects. It is amazing and I'm wondering if the acidity level obtained by the lemon juice (while cheaper and more available than lime juice) might be maintained using lime juice as well? What do you think?

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    Replies
    1. In my humble opinion I think lime would work great and taste great also.

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  9. I haven't canned blackberry pie filling before but have been wanting to, so I am very excited to find your blog! My cobbler recipe has a bit of butter and vanilla in it, but no cinnamon...in your opinion would it be ok to add those at the time of canning? Also, I have about 30 quarts of frozen berries from this summer. I am wondering if I can thaw and can with those, or if I would be better to wait until next year. Thanks!

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  10. Regina

    is the cinnamon optional?

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  11. could you make a traditional pie filling recipe and NOT use the Clear Jel and still process it? I saw where someone had used regular cornstarch to thicken it like you would a normal pie or cobbler.

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  12. I have seven gallon bags of beautiful blackberries in my freezer right now. I will be using this recipe to make pie filling to can.

    I make several of your Apple Pie in a Bag froze them (had 300 lbs of apples this year) and I couldnt wait - had to make a pie. Turned out great. Best apple pie ever! Hopefully the blackberry pie will be just as great.

    Thank you for great recipes.

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  13. Made this tonight. 14 quarts and four pints. Stamp of approval from husband. Really like the clear jel base. I can see using this with peaches...a little extra cinnamon...

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